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Chasing down electrical problems on modern cars is becoming a more and more common part of every technician’s work day. Using this testing method will help you find those faults faster and easier…as long as you understand it!

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25 Responses to “Auto Repair: Voltage Drop Testing: A Powerful Electrical Testing Method”

  1. REDTEAM22003 says:

    thanks for the porn music…

  2. ResidentialNemevil says:

    Whenever a circuit is on and you pass the final load(s), you should always get a reading of 0 volts, otherwise, you have a short circuit.

  3. IamBigButter says:

    great video.

  4. monahanfamily11 says:

    This was a great informative video – Thanks – I plan to use this in my class!

  5. gst69man says:

    excellent vid. many thanks

  6. MrHvm1985 says:

    This is a good video but it seems a bit complicated..A video showing all these procedures on a vehicle would make things easier to understand..And that music doesn’t help..LOL..

  7. angel3421 says:

    Like the videoreally good, but to check resistances in a circuit (sometimes) may required to removed power

  8. autoservicetech says:

    @angel3421

    That’s if you want to test resistance with your ohmmeter. But that often misses problems that this method won’t…

  9. ss5dojo says:

    Hello, you mentioned it can’t be below .5v on the ground side, in school I am being taught that it CANNOT be below .1 or there is a problem.
    0.200v at ground=bad

  10. ss5dojo says:

    sorry, meant can’t be over .1v

  11. autoservicetech says:

    @ss5dojo
    .5 volts is a general rule. For computer input/output circuits, I prefer less than .2 total. Over any one connector, less than .1v. Starter circuits will work with higher limits, say 1.0v. It all depends on how much current is flowing…more current, more tolerance for drop.

  12. Stratau says:

    Thanks, excelent video, clear and detailed.

  13. weldean46 says:

    nice video, i work with this stuff almost every day in the transmissions.

  14. yaseechannel9 says:

    excellent vid. thanks for posting……

  15. augstspriegums says:

    Great! Thanks!

  16. xann1 says:

    get rid of the fucked music dude

  17. dmorley100 says:

    Great video!!! After all the years I’ve spent working on cars I’ve come to the conclusion that this’s one of the testing method’s that seperates great electrical guys from the comeback kings in the shop.

  18. CRACKERDOODLE says:

    Thanks man

  19. Einsteinian99 says:

    Great vid!

  20. spelunkerd says:

    Thanks for posting.

  21. gtuani says:

    @ss5dojo
    pay close attention. maybe you were taught for another circuit like the starter.

  22. gtuani says:

    good video, excellent, but things get harder when working near the engine compartment.. but thats the job of the mechanic. god help us! and protect our fingers!!

  23. hoopfan71 says:

    This video is extremely helpful. I have a problem circuit in my car, so I’m hoping this technique will prove useful.

  24. HBRacing04 says:

    To whomever created this clip:
    Thank you very much for the post. Small things like this clip make the world a better place. It might seem like a simple clip but i’m sure this shit saved a lot of people a lot of money on costly repairs; including me. So Thank you

  25. HBRacing04 says:

    To whomever created this clip:
    Thank you very much for the post. Small things like this clip make the world a better place. It might seem like a simple clip but i’m sure this shit saved a lot of people a lot of money on costly repairs; including me. So Thank you

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